The City Nearest the Slain

Deuteronomy 21:1-9
Author: Bobby Lewis
Topics: Murder, Responsibility, Sin
Series: Old Testament Sermons

Preview

The ceremonies here, ordained to be observed on the discovery of a slaughtered corpse, show the ideas of sanctity which the Mosaic law sought to associate with human blood, the horror which murder inspired,  as well as the fears that were felt lest God should avenge it on the country at large, and the pollution which the land was supposed to contract from the effusion of innocent blood.

 

According to Jewish writers, the Sanhedrin, taking charge of such a case, sent a deputation to examine the neighborhood. They reported to the nearest town to the spot where the body was found. An order was then issued by their supreme authority to the elders or magistrates of that town, to provide the heifer at the civic expense and go through the appointed ceremonial.

 

The engagement of the public authorities in the work of atonement, the purchase of the victim heifer, the conducting it to a "rough valley" which might be at a considerable distance, and which, as the original implies, was a stream, in the waters of which the polluting blood would be wiped away from the land, and a desert withal, incapable of cultivation; the washing of the hands, which was an ancient act symbolical of innocence-- the whole of the ceremonial was calculated to make a deep impression on the Jewish, as well as on the Oriental, mind generally; to stimulate the activity of the magistrates in the discharge of their official duties; to lead to the discovery of the criminal, and the repression of crime....


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